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American Culture
Content Spotlight: National Poetry Month

It’s April, and that means National Poetry Month in the U.S.A. The month is a celebration, a reminder to appreciate poetry, and to encourage attention to poetry in schools. There’s a poem for every taste. Write a few of your own during National Poetry Month.

You and your class can participate in the activities below or learn more about National Poetry Month.

Social Media Activities

  1. Do you have a favorite poem? Tell us what it is on Facebook.
  2. Share your favorite line from a poem with us on Facebook.
  3. Is rapping the new poetry? Let us know what you think on Facebook.

Classroom Activities

Write a Senses Poem (Activity Level: Lower Intermediate - Advanced)

Materials:

Instructions:

As a class, brainstorm ideas of subjects on the board. Write several sensorial prompts (I see…, I hear…, I taste…, etc.). Using the subjects the class brainstormed, have the students finish the prompts. Then have students create their own and present it to the class.

Download a Sample Lesson Plan

National Poetry Month

It’s April, and that means National Poetry Month in the U.S.A. The month is a celebration, a reminder to appreciate poetry, and to encourage attention to poetry in schools. What is so great about poetry? Well, poems allow us to see the world in a fresh, new way. That’s just what Carl Sandburg does in his poem “The Fog.”

The fog comes
on little cat feet.

It sits looking
over harbor and city
on silent haunches
and then moves on.

That’s why poetry is powerful. The words are charged with image and rhythm – and surprise.
Poetry doesn’t have to be hard. It can be simple and fun, as in this children’s rhyme:

The thunder roared
The lightning flashed
A tree fell down
A bug got smashed

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