Photo of Forum 39 Cover
Expand
English Teaching Forum 2003, Volume 41, Number 2
This issue is full of jazzy teaching ideas. A feature article on jazz is joined by articles on ESP, professional development, and the use of computers and web resources to enhance writing and speaking skills.

This issue is full of jazzy teaching ideas. A feature article on jazz is joined by articles on ESP, professional development, and the use of computers and web resources to enhance writing and speaking skills.

Author: William P. Ancker
Format: Text
Availability

For international subscriptions of English Teaching Forum please contact the Public Affairs or Cultural Affairs section of the U.S. Embassy in your country.

U.S. Subscriptions: English Teaching Forum is exempted from the Congressional restriction on distribution of Department of State-produced materials in the United States. U.S. residents who want to order the printed edition can order from the U.S. Superintendent of Documents.

Table of Contents

IntroductionExpand

Teaching English is a bit like teaching jazz, the editor muses. Both require excellent listening skills and timing. Both are usually done in front of other people, and both require one to improvise.

Author: William P. Ancker
Format: Text
Availability
Options for Teacher Professional DevelopmentExpand

This article addresses the relationship of high-quality teacher characteristics to student learning and then presents eight elements of development and six models of teacher training. The eight elements are: voluntary participation, mutual respect, collaboration, action and reflection, organizational setting, choice and change, motivation, and self-direction. The six models are: conference planning (set goals before going), peer coaching, action research (how to improve one’s own practice), collaborative study groups, individual development plan, and dialogue journals.

Author: Gabriel H. Díaz-Maggioli
Format: Text
Availability
What Mary Shelley Never Wrote: Using Basic Computer Skills to Enhance Student WritingExpand

This article describes an inspired, well-managed process writing class project for intermediate language learners. The author used Mary Shelley’s book Frankenstein as a creative writing tool in class to develop writing and computer skills. Students read and discussed the book. Working in a collaborative format, students wrote a short story sequel to the novel and offered revision advice in a workshop format. The sequels were then compiled and shared with beginner language learners. The author pointed out that the sense of audience was also established with this project.

Author: Maria Bortoluzzi
Format: Text
Availability
Using Web Resources in a Public Speaking ClassExpand

This article describes ways to teach public speaking students how to efficiently locate information on the Internet, how to quickly evaluate and analyze those resources, and how best to navigate the Web. The author’s lesson leads the students through a Web-based scavenger hunt, included in the article, and has information about how to evaluate sites. The author expands on these lessons to show the students how the Internet can help prepare and deliver a speech.

Author: Shiao-Chuan Kung
Format: Text
Availability
What is English for Specific Purposes?Expand

This article gives examples of the lessons the author learned from years of teaching ESP. She learned to investigate authentic material thoroughly before making assumptions about learner needs. She tells of occasions on which she relied on the input from textbook writers and job supervisors who made errors in analyzing what students most needed in their language classes. She discussed a learner-focused style, which follows the theory that career development and language development follow the same path, from specific and technical to context- and experience-based.

Author: Rebecca Smoak
Format: Text
Availability
Teaching Weak FormsExpand

This article describes a pronunciation concept referred to as the weak form, a compression of sounds used to keep the rhythm of spoken English. The author uses the word “that” as an example. Stressing or not stressing the word “that” when reading aloud the sentence “John thinks that man is evil” changes the meaning. Reading “that” as unstressed is an example of the weak form. The author provides examples of how to teach the weak form to provide students with better spoken English and better comprehension.

Author: Liang Wenxia
Format: Text
Availability
Language and Life Sciences: Mapping the Human Genome (Reprinted from Chapter 1 of the FORUM Electronic Journal Language and Life Sciences)Expand

The authors use the study of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid, the building blocks of all living things) to develop student vocabulary and assist in developing a fundamental understanding of the science behind DNA. The article provides supplemental material including helpful Web sites, student group activities with handouts, vocabulary lessons, and warm-up activities.

Authors: Donna M. Brinton, Christine Holten, Jodi L. Nooyen
Format: Text
Availability
All That JazzExpand

This article is the first of three to introduce Jazz music, which was born in the United States over a period of 200 years. Jazz was influenced by African, Latin American, and European music. It is generally accepted that Jazz was first recognized in New Orleans, Louisiana, in the southeastern United States. This mostly historical article features many Jazz musicians including Ferdinand “Jelly Roll” Morton, Buddy Bolden, Joe “King” Oliver, and Louis “Satchmo” Armstrong. A list of Web sites is included.

Author: C. L. Smoak
Format: Text, Image / Poster / Maps
Availability
The Cotton ClubExpand

This one-page piece details The Cotton Club, one of the most glamorous dance and music clubs in New York City in the 1920s and 1930s. The Cotton Club was located in Harlem, which in the 1920s was an African-American residential and cultural business center in New York. The club had 30 to 50 chorus girls who danced and sang and were only hired if they were beautiful and very tall. Although the singers and dancers were almost all black, the audience was almost all white, which was a sign of the racial American society at the time.

Author: C. L. Smoak
Format: Text, Image / Poster / Maps
Availability
Great Nicknames of JazzExpand

The last of a three-piece article describes many of the nicknames that leading American Jazz musicians had. A nickname is a name that a person earns in addition to their given name. For example, Edward Ellington was called “Duke” by his friends and family when he was a child because he acted like a member of a royal family. Musicians like Lady Day, Duke Ellington, and Dizzy Gillespie were leaders in the Jazz music culture.

Author: C. L. Smoak
Format: Text
Availability
The Lighter SideExpand

This "Lighter Side" begins with a contest to name a Jazz song. The answer is "Georgia On My Mind." Although there is an American state called Georgia, Georgia is the name of a girl for whom the song was written in 1930. In the second section of "The Lighter Side," definitions and uses of the word Jazz are given.

Format: Text
Availability